Wilfred Owen (1893-1918)
Owen is certainly Britain’s most well-known and beloved First World War poet. (A lot of people remember him for his poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’, taught ad nauseam in secondary schools nationwide.) In 1917, after fighting in the trenches, he developed a close relationship with Siegfried Sassoon, a fellow poet and soldier, when they met in an Edinburgh hospital. It was through Sassoon that Owen became acquainted with numerous homosexual writers such as Robert Ross and Charles Scott-Moncrieff. Biographers and people who knew Owen personally have stated that he was himself homosexual, that some of his poems have homoerotic themes, and that Scott-Moncrieff wrote numerous sonnets to him.

Wilfred Owen (1893-1918)

Owen is certainly Britain’s most well-known and beloved First World War poet. (A lot of people remember him for his poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’, taught ad nauseam in secondary schools nationwide.) In 1917, after fighting in the trenches, he developed a close relationship with Siegfried Sassoon, a fellow poet and soldier, when they met in an Edinburgh hospital. It was through Sassoon that Owen became acquainted with numerous homosexual writers such as Robert Ross and Charles Scott-Moncrieff. Biographers and people who knew Owen personally have stated that he was himself homosexual, that some of his poems have homoerotic themes, and that Scott-Moncrieff wrote numerous sonnets to him.